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April 13, 2015
Water Energy - joint utility programs, water efficiency, water energy, water energy programs - California Sustainability Alliance

The water-energy nexus is a critical concept in California today, due to increasingly stressed water supplies and state greenhouse gas reduction goals. The nexus is described as the interaction between water services and energy services: energy services rely on reliable access to water and water delivery services depend on access to energy. In short, saving water saves energy and vice versa. In California, water is one of the state’s largest end uses of both natural gas and electricity. Of the state’s water-related natural gas use (30% of overall natural gas use), the vast majority goes to residential, commercial, and industrial end uses, at 98.5%. Of the state’s water-related electricity use (19% of overall electricity use), 40% goes to water extraction, conveyance, treatment, distribution, and wastewater systems.

At the 2013 Utility Sustainability Roundtable, conducted by the California Sustainability Alliance and Southern California Gas Company, participants from utilities, water agencies, and cities expressed strong interest in a joint water-energy efficiency program collaboration guidebook to support and enhance coordinated efforts towards a sustainable water-energy nexus. Though progress is being made within the water and energy industries already, a guidebook was envisioned to help fully realize the synergy between these systems.

In late 2014, the California Sustainability Alliance completed the Water-Energy Program Collaboration Guidebook in response to this interest. The intended audience of this guidebook is energy utilities and water agencies in California. The goal is for readers to come away with a better understanding of how energy utilities and water agencies can work together on joint water conservation and energy efficiency programs, and apply this knowledge to new initiatives at their own organizations. The guidebook offers insight and real-world examples along the following joint program development and implementation process:

From research, interviews, and industry experience, the guidebook identifies the top nine collaboration strategies to include:

  1. Establish measurable, specific goals at the beginning of a program and conduct periodic evaluations.
  2. Dedicate a staff member/champion – someone passionate about efficiency partnerships, who actively seeks ways to overcome barriers and come up with creative solutions.
  3. Establish a clear decision-making process and rules of operations, and back this up by drafting legal documents.
  4. Effectively communicate between partners – keep in regular contact with representatives at partner organizations to stay informed and involved.
  5. Be persistent and pro-active. Sometimes a legal agreement will have to be reviewed by the legal department dozens of times – but don't give up on it.
  6. Play to partners' strengths: assume leadership roles and responsibilities based on areas of expertise and/or ability to contribute to the program (e.g., one partner has the expertise to lead program design and implementation oversight while the other has the resources to handle program administration).
  7. Use a “one-stop-shop” approach where feasible so customers can find all of their efficiency opportunities and information in one place. More generally, always simplify things for the customer – this will help increase market adoption.
  8. Simplify internal joint program processes – this will reduce expenses and staff time. This includes approval, cost-sharing, and data-sharing processes. When possible, use an umbrella memorandum of understanding to formally establish these process improvements.
  9. Monitor legislation while designing programs; for example, stay current on appliance code changes that will impact rebates.

Readers are encouraged to use the guidebook as a foundation for further independent reading and conversations, as the water-energy collaboration effort must extend far beyond these pages. Additionally, stay tuned for further work in this area, as the California Public Utilities Commission is developing tools to assist energy utilities and water agencies in determining the cost effectiveness of joint water-energy efficiency programs. Download the full guidebook here.

December 29, 2014
Green Buildings - benchmarking, energy efficiency, green building, real estate resources, water efficiency - California Sustainability Alliance

The California Sustainability Alliance is proud to announce an industry report which summarizes the outcome of the Existing Buildings Think Tank Roundtable held in partnership with the USGBC-LA Existing Buildings Committee. Over 70 participants representing building owners and managers, engineers, utilities, government, trade associations, and other industry professionals were in attendance to discuss ideas and emerging trends related to the operation and performance of existing buildings. The Alliance is managed by Navigant Energy Services and funded by Southern California Gas.

The Think Tank Roundtable is an annual, half-day event hosted by the USGBC-LA Existing Buildings Committee and chapter strategic partners typically focusing on Class A buildings. This year, the Alliance sponsored an expanded scope of the meeting to include an afternoon session for Class B and C building owners. The purpose of the Think Tank Roundtable is to share best practices, lessons learned, resources, challenges, and opportunities around topics relevant to owners and managers of Class A, B & C buildings as well as tenants, brokers, government, and building professionals from all sectors. Two industry reports (one for Class A owners and one for Class B and C owners) were produced as a result of the Think Tank event and follow-up interviews with key stakeholders.

Green and energy-efficient buildings demand higher rent, increase tenant productivity, reduce operating costs, and have higher occupancy rates. The upfront cost of green building improvements is a deterrent commonly cited by building owners. However, data show that green retrofits and increased energy and water efficiency increase property values and many upgrades can deliver attractive, short-term returns. During the meeting, industry leaders from the Greater Los Angeles area identified best practices, new opportunities, and existing resources in multiple topic areas to help Class B and C building owners and managers take charge of their building performance. The report summarizes industry leaders’ discussion of these topics:

  • Building Codes and Standards
  • Energy Efficiency and Energy Management Plans
  • Water Efficiency Opportunities
  • Financing Green Retrofits
  • New Building Technologies
  • Building Sustainability Trends
  • Climate Change
  • Other Industry Updates

The recently released reports highlight key outcomes of the roundtable discussions and integrate feedback from additional stakeholders during the months following the event. The findings and objectives of the reports are to:

  • Help utilities understand how to improve their regulatory and incentive programs by providing feedback about how they can best serve these critical yet often under-represented customers.
  • Encourage owners and managers of Class A, B and C properties to improve portfolio-wide energy and water efficiency and implement green building practices.
  • Inspire action to deepen environmental goals in the existing building sector by defining critical challenges and potential solutions, and by inviting key stakeholders to engage in the discussion.
  • Provide resources and education to service providers that are in a position to help building owners design and implement energy and water conservation strategies.

View the full reports here:

Video interviews from multiple experts at the event were also produced.

January 15, 2014
Utilities - energy efficiency, GHG emissions, green local government, municipal facilities, water efficiency, water energy - California Sustainability Alliance

The path to sustainability is difficult. Collaboration and joint efforts can help ease our journey. To this end, leaders from water and energy utilities as well as representatives from local governments of Southern California recently participated in a roundtable to discuss the opportunities to support each other in their efforts to promote energy and water efficiency. The 2013 Utility Sustainability Roundtable, the fourth such event, addressed three main topics: The Water-Energy Nexus, Aligning City Planning and Utility Incentive Cycles, and Cap-and-Trade.

Starting with the Water-Energy Nexus, attendees identified finding ways to present both water and energy efficiency opportunities to customers simultaneously as key to increasing participation in these programs. Such joint marketing must be specific to the customer and therefore requires water and energy suppliers to work together to raise awareness about savings opportunities and available incentives in their overlapping service territories. Joint water-energy audits have also proven to be a successful way to coordinate for increased customer participation.

The discussion then moved to Aligning City Planning and Utility Incentive Cycles. Coordinated communications between utilities and local governments may allow more trust to build and incentive funding to better enable scheduled system renovations in municipal buildings.

The last discussion topic related to an emerging topic: Cap-and-Trade. A forward-looking concept was presented that provides a framework by which utilities might be able to put additional funds toward the energy efficiency projects of local governments in return for the resulting emissions reductions.

The study also highlights a couple initiatives that would help move the ideas discussed forward. Download  the full report for more details.

December 17, 2013
Water Energy - on-site water recycling, recycled water, wastewater treatment, water distribution, water efficiency, water energy - California Sustainability Alliance
On-site water recycling holds potential water savings for commercial and municipal buildings.

California faces growing water scarcity concerns. Droughts pose continuous uncertainties to the water supply, but on-site water recycling could help alleviate the pressures of these uncertainties. On-site water recycling could contribute to increased water supply reliability as well as other environmental goals, such as reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

On-site water recycling systems are primarily one of two technology types - constructed wetlands or membrane bioreactors (MBR). For more information on these technologies, please refer to the Alliance’s report, “On-Site Water Generation: An Analysis of Options and Case Study” published December 2012.

The 2012 Alliance study found that on-site recycled water systems can supply water at lower energy intensity than imported water and desalination in Southern California. Nevertheless, most of the existing applications of recycled water are municipal-level wastewater treatment plants. On-site water recycling systems draw wastewater directly from a building’s toilets, showers, and laundry, treat it on-site, and reuse it to meet on-site non-potable needs, such as toilet flushing and irrigation. Installing these systems requires developers to not only manage the initial capital cost, but to confront a challenging regulatory environment. On-site water recycling is a relatively new concept and doesn’t fit neatly into existing regulatory frameworks focused on water-recycling and water- and waste-water treatment. Figuring out how to apply existing regulations – and understanding if the existing frameworks even apply – can be challenging for project developers as well as for those charged with preserving public health and safety. New regulatory frameworks must be developed to enable the installation of these systems.

As a follow-up to the 2012 Alliance Huntington Beach Study, the Alliance investigated further to verify the list of key regulatory hurdles for on-site water recycling and to identify potential solutions. A game-changer like revising the regulatory framework may take considerable time and resources, but the Alliance aims to also present good first steps. These are meant to be easier to implement in the short-term to generate momentum for those goals that are harder to achieve.

To first create awareness regarding the regulatory hurdles facing on-site water recycling system installations, the Alliance has released a new study entitled California On-Site Water Recycling: Policy Brief. This study documents the barriers to on-site water recycling systems and also and presents potential solutions. The policy brief focuses on the following barriers:

  • Lack of clear information about how to apply for permits;
  • Expensive daily coliform laboratory sampling and analysis
  • Stringent certification requirements for system operators

 

Key study conclusions include:

·      On-site recycled water systems are an emerging technology with the potential to play a role in helping manage California’s increasing water scarcity. 

·      Immediate actions should be taken to perform additional work on understanding potential regulatory models, estimating benefits, and initiating pilot activity.

·      An information portal should be designed so that potential developers of on-site water recycling systems and staff at key agencies have access to detailed information. 

·      One stretch goal to work towards is an exception to the Title 22 requirement for daily coliform sampling for on-site water recycling systems with a track-record of high water quality.

The study also highlights a number of case studies as examples of on-site water recycling. Download  the full report for more details.

 

July 26, 2013
Alliance News - economy, environmental affairs, environmental justice, green business, sustainable landscaping, water conservation, water efficiency, water energy - California Sustainability Alliance

On July 18, the water and environmental industries lost one of its leaders. The California Sustainability Alliance (Alliance) joins the many others mourning the loss of Lillian Kawasaki, who passed away on that day.

Ms. Kawasaki was a founding member of the Alliance’s Advisory Committee and offered invaluable advice on the organization’s start and early development. We will miss her wisdom and support, and will strive to keep her commitment to the environment and sustainability alive in the Alliance’s work.

Craig McDonald, Managing Director for Navigant Consulting and Project Director of the Alliance summed up Ms. Kawasaki’s influence: “Lillian’s insight, leadership, and vast knowledge of the water energy landscape was essential in shaping the Alliance’s great work in these fields.”

Highlights of Ms. Kawasaki career include launching the City of Los Angeles’ Environmental Affairs Department, heading the city Community Development Department and serving as assistant general manager of environmental affairs and economic development for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Additionally, she was a member of numerous state and federal water policy committees during the course of her career, serving on the board of the Water Replenishment District (WRD) of Southern California and such professional organizations as the Association of Women in Water, Energy and Environment.

For more on Ms. Kawasaki’s remarkable life and commitment to public service and the environment, see her obituary in the Los Angeles Times.